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Cheap Turunc Holidays

Cheap Turunc Holidays

Find information on Turunc in our Travel Guide covering sights, foods and nightlife plus more...

Turunc Introduction

Turunc lies on the south west coast of Turkey close to the point where the Aegean and the Mediterranean meet. The transfer time from Dalaman Aiport is between ninety minutes and two hours. Surrounded by hills and looking out across the sheltered bay, this one time fishing village offers a warm welcome to holidaymakers. There is accommodation to suit all budgets, restaurants catering for all tastes and a lively nightlife. The sand and shingle beach is sheltered and provides many opportunities for water sports.

Why Go To Turunc?

A Turunc holiday offers a relaxing break by the sea with a good stretch of beach and a range of leisure facilities. It has more than enough shops, cafes and restaurants to keep holidaymakers satisfied. There are excursions to the many tourist attractions in the neighbouring countryside, some by boat and others by bus or by jeep.

Turunc is popular with a wide range of holidaymakers. Families with small children and those who just want to relax in the sun will find the beach has safe shallow waters with sporting activities for the more energetic. Those with an interest in history will find the area fascinating with many ancient sites within easy travelling distance. Nightlife is fairly lively with many bars providing live music although it is possibly too quiet for the young singles market.

When To Go To Turunc

The Turunc holiday season lasts from early spring until late autumn when the temperature range is from the twenties to the high thirties. Although the summer period is the most popular, spring and autumn are good times to visit historical sites when the days are cooler.

Turunc - The Place

Originally a small fishing village, Turunc is a pleasant resort lying around a deep bay and sheltered by hills. The town has good accommodation with many small family run hotels that offer a friendly service. The beach with sun beds and palm umbrellas offers hours of relaxation interspersed with cooling swims and water sports requiring varying degrees of energy. There are bars, cafes and small restaurants along the beach which provide daylong refreshments. The town has a fair number of shops and a market on Mondays where you can buy your holiday souvenirs and mementoes.

There are many interesting tourist attractions in the area. These include the five bays tour which offers a barbeque and the opportunity for snorkelling, the Pamukkale Lime Terraces with their mineral pools, and of course, the remains of the ancient Roman city of Ephesus with its remarkable buildings. Jeep excursions are very popular as they go into the mountains and through villages where daily life appears to have been untouched by the modern world.

Turunc Nightlife

Turunc nightlife is varied and fairly lively with bars and restaurants in the town and along the waterfront. Many of them have live music and often give displays of belly dancing. There are cruises around the bay where you can eat dinner while watching the twinkling lights of the town dancing on the water. The waterfront bars offer a perfect spot for enjoying the spectacular sunsets.

Turunc Shopping

Turunc has a good variety of shops and small supermarkets providing for your holiday needs. Market day is Monday and here you can hone your haggling skills in the search for bargains. The stalls sell lots of fake designer goods, leather and textiles, ceramics and jewellery as well as a range of holiday memorabilia. Those looking for a greater variety of shops can travel to Marmaris by water taxi, a journey of ninety minutes.

Turunc Eating

Turunc restaurants serve a wide variety of food from traditional to international cuisine and cater for most tastes. Being a coastal resort, fish features prominently on menus. Turkish food is very tasty and includes stuffed peppers, aubergines and vine leaves, clay-pot casseroles, kebabs and of course feta cheese, olive and tomato salads. Borek are puff pastry pies filled with meat, cheese or potatoes that make delicious snacks. Rice dishes are also popular. If you wish to sample local cuisine, try a plate of meze, the Turkish equivalent of Greek Tapas, where you are given small portions of a variety of dishes.

Apart from strong black coffee, the national drink of Turkey is ‘raki’, an aniseed and liquorice flavoured alcohol.

Children are always given a warm welcome even in the more exclusive restaurants.