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Cheap Kamari Holidays

Cheap Kamari Holidays

Find information on Kamari in our Travel Guide covering sights, foods and nightlife plus more...

Kamari Introduction

Kamari lies on the south east coast of Santorini, ten kilometres from Thira and has a transfer time from the airport of twenty minutes. Following the devastating earthquake of 1956, the village was completely rebuilt. Although a popular resort, Kamari never appears overcrowded. There is a great choice of restaurants and tavernas along the waterfront which cater for all tastes. The eateries are interspersed with small beach and gift shops where you can purchase holiday mementoes.

Why Go To Kamari?

Kamari offers a beach based holiday with guaranteed summer sunshine, warm clear water and a range of recreational activities. A choice of nightlife is available from romantic meals on the beach to lively bars and clubs. Kamari is well placed for visiting Akrotiri, the ancient Minoan city that is still in the process of excavation.

Kamari is popular with a wide range of holidaymakers, from families to couples young and old. Families with small children looking for ‘sand castle’ terrain may be a little disappointed. The beach is volcanic, grey and gritty, and becomes very hot underfoot in the afternoons. Water sports enthusiasts will find a variety of activities.

When To Go To Kamari

The Kamari holiday season lasts from April until October when the temperature ranges from twenty to thirty degrees. Summer is the most popular time to visit the island.

Kamari - The Place

Kamari on the south east coast of Santorini lies very close to the airport. Some may think that the benefit of a short transfer time is outweighed by the low flying planes as they come in to land. It is not however a busy airport and most visitors cease to notice the arrivals after the first day.

Kamari is surrounded by rather barren hills which are enlivened by a scattering of white houses and the occasional olive tree. The resort stretches along the narrow black beach which children with buckets and spades will find disappointing. The sea is difficult to access as the beach turns into slippery, smooth rock as you enter the water. It is best to enter the sea from rocks that jut out from the beach, but this of course is not suitable for small children. A variety of water sports are available including diving to discover the interesting volcanic scene beneath the waves.

The road along the waterfront is virtually traffic-free and is filled with small hotels and apartments, shops and supermarkets, and a large number of restaurants and tavernas catering for all tastes.

There are regular local buses to Fira where you will find a labyrinth of stepped, cobbled streets filled with shops of every description. The town is built on a hillside and the stepped streets are difficult for those with problems of mobility. Most visitors also take a trip to Oia, a beautiful town in the daylight but truly glorious when the setting sun transforms it, basking as it does in a warm orange glow.

A Kamari holiday offers a relaxing seaside break in a guarantee of glorious summer sun with a variety of leisure activities both in and out of the water.

Kamari Nightlife

Kamari nightlife has something for everyone. A peaceful evening in a restaurant or taverna overlooking the sea or lively bars with music and discos, the choice is yours.

Kamari Shopping

Kamari has a large number of gift shops especially along the road lining the beach. The stock carried by these shops varies little and includes T-shirts and towels, tasteful ceramics, embroidered linens and leather goods. There is a regular bus service to Fira which is a shopoholics dream. There are hundreds of shops in its narrow cobbled and stepped streets including an amazing number of jewellers at the top of the town near the Church and the Dominican Convent.

Kamari Eating

Kamari has numerous tavernas, cafes, bars and restaurants which provide a wide range of food to accommodate most tastes. Traditional Greek food relies heavily on fish simply cooked and is quite delicious. Moussaka is another Greek favourite made from minced lamb and aubergines. International cuisine is also available in the larger restaurants. Fast food stalls such as Souvlatzidiki sell takeaway souvlakis, a type of kebab. For a more substantial snack these are sometimes wrapped in pita bread and called gyros. The Santorini wines are inexpensive and very palatable.